On Your 6th

Six feels like a turning point…

image source: http://www.canstockphoto.com/images-photos/six-fingers.html 

After observing you in school last week, I can really say that my baby has grown up to be a responsible little man. You’re slowly coming out of your shell and you are now more confident of who you are. I’m really proud that you’re starting to form friendships and enjoy playing with your classmates, even if I’m around.

My wish on your birthday is that you don’t lose the curiosity to learn more and ask questions. It might be a difficult task for me to provide you with the correct answers (Why is there a black hole? Why did your grandpa die? Can I go to the moon?) but seeing how you like trivia and reading books transport me to my own childhood.

I used to wonder how this time will be like. No amount of studying and reading parenting books could’ve prepared me. But, we’ll learn together. As with the past five years, you’ve taught me to believe in my capabilities as a mom. I know you’ll bring in more lessons and challenges but I promise you that I will always try my best to focus on you — to focus on what matters.

To infinity and beyond! 

Happy 6th birthday, Z! We’ll make all your dreams come true.

Thank you for visiting my blog. Let\'s get more connected: Google+

Z’s Big Boy Bed

There will come a time that milestones will feel bittersweet.

Case in point: Z is now sleeping all by himself in his own bed but still in the same room with us.

IMG_1035
This was taken on the first night he slept on his own bed! I’m proud of him! And proud of myself for not putting him back beside us!

IMG_20170418_015226

His transition may seem abrupt, but he was asking for his own bed since last year. I think I was brushing the thought away because it will mean that he’s really a big boy already.

But, who am I kidding?!

He IS a big boy already. And while I’m happy that he is being independent, it means that he is needing me less, which kinda pinches my heart a little.

It wasn’t too long ago when I was wishing he could take a bath on his own, dress by himself, eat independently, wash his butt after he poops and read books by himself. And now that he can do all of these, I find myself asking him “Do you need my help?” And he would always say “Let me try” or “I can do it”.

Bittersweet.

My love forever <3
My love forever <3

Z’s Nursery Recognition Day

A few weeks ago, we received a letter from Z’s school that he was a medalist candidate and would need to take the medalist test. I was over the moon proud of my little boy! But during the Recognition Day, his name wasn’t on the list of medalist awardees.

IMG_20170314_070115
Beyond ecstatic!

I would be lying if I say that there wasn’t a rush of thoughts going through my head — we could’ve studied more; should I have set a no-gadget rule during school days; what happened?!

Why was getting an award important to me? Would it make me a better mom? Was it a tell-tale sign of what his future will be? 

I think at this point, getting an award is more for the parents than it is for the child. School at this age should be about playing, making friends and just enjoying.

Then, the program started and I was enveloped in peace seeing Z in his purple long-sleeved polo singing and doing the actions. He’s come a long way from the first school day when he didn’t want to let me go to someone unfazed with being on stage with a lot of audience. Medalist or not, I know that Z did his very best! I rest with the thought that at least he qualified to be a medalist and he didn’t have a hard time coping the whole school year.

IMG_20170315_085915
Getting his certificate from Bro. Vic and Principal Ramelle.

And then I came across this article and gave me a lot of insight. There are far more important traits to have than awards and medals. Grades will just be on the paper; being kind, compassionate and generous will be long-lasting. 

Just yesterday we received a box of cookies and I told my kids that they can share 1 cookie. I broke the cookie in half and gave them their piece. Z then went on to break his piece  and said “this is for you, Mom.” And my heart swelled.

Most of the time, it’s easy to focus on what your child is not, completely ignoring what he already is – the best version of who he’s supposed to be.